Women Empowerment and the Dog

A Facebook post compared a woman to a flea on his dog.  The woman had declared that she will enter a temple in India in the backdrop of the recent judgement by the Supreme Court granting equal rights to women to enter that temple.  It is believed that the deity at the temple is a Brahmachari (conduct consistent with Lord Brahma), (also meaning a man with the virtue of celibacy when unmarried and fidelity when married) and no woman must enter the temple.  When the case of woman entry to the said temple came up for hearing in the Supreme Court, the judges had to rule in favour of allowing equal rights to both man and woman as the Constitution of India grants it..

During my morning walk with our dog Maximus on a bitterly cold Canadian winter morning, our neighbour, Mr Steve, a septuagenarian  asked “If you can  walk slowly, I can accompany you both.”  We commenced our walk slowly along the walkway cleared of snow that had fallen that morning.

After about five minutes of walking, we came to an intersection with traffic lights.  The ‘Green Man’ signal for pedestrian crossing had just turned to flashing ‘Red Hand’.  Mr Steve said “Walk fast, we can get on to the other side before the traffic starts moving across.”

“The signal has turned red, do we need to cross now?” I enquired.  “Do not worry, get going” said Mr Steve.  On crossing the road, Mr Steve reminisced about his youth and said “In 1939, the Second World War commenced and I was only eleven years old then, studying in Grade 6.  Our family then lived a hundred miles North of Toronto.  We had a dairy farm with over two hundred cows.  On the outbreak of the war, like all able men of Canada, my father and two elder brothers joined the Canadian Army and moved to Europe to fight the war.  Running of our dairy farm was taken over by mother and my two elder sisters.

In those days most activities in Canada were taken over by women – from driving trucks and buses, running the banking and postal services, grocery shops and petrol pumps – anything and everything – as most men had joined the Armed Forces and had sailed off to Europe.

After the war, in 1945, my father and brothers returned home.  My mother did not allow them anywhere near the diary farm as it had become ‘hers’.  With the experience of digging trenches during the war and also in building roads and tracks towards the war efforts, my father and brothers started a road construction company in Toronto.  On my graduation in engineering from University of Toronto, I too joined my father’s company and retired as its CEO a few years back.

What all fields Canadian women took over during the war, they have not allowed the men folk to come near them  That is why Canada is where it is today, all because of women empowerment.”

“What does this story got to do with our jay-walking across the road?” I asked.

Mr Steve commenced his justification ” It seems you are not aware of priorities in Canada.  It begins with the children, then women, followed by dogs and then other pets, then is wildlife and then are the trees and plants, and last, but the least come the men.  If we two were only to cross the road I would have never in my wildest dreams thought of crossing the road.  Just because the dog was with us, I told you to get across.”

“Why so?” I asked.

“In case two old men like us get struck by a vehicle, the Canadian courts will only grant may be forty to fifty thousand dollars.  If the dog even gets brushed by a vehicle, the driver will have hell to pay as the court will surely decree at least a million dollars.  That fear in every Canadian driver will never allow them to move an inch  even if the traffic light turns green” Mr Steve explained.

In case real women empowerment has to come into the Indian society, some major catastrophe like what happened in Canada, USA or Europe during Second World War need to occur.  Supreme Court judgements, or forced entry of women to some temples is not going to give women equal rights they need to be given.  The Indian males need to accept this reality and change for the betterment of the society.

 

A Colourful Stroll Along Lake Ontario


Port Credit located ten kilometers from our home was an old trading port till the 1800s.  It is now a marina for boats.  Along the lake shore is a seven kilometer trail that turns into multitude of colours every fall.


Port Credit is located at the mouth of Credit River on Lake Ontario.  The ship Ridgetown was sunk here on June 21, 1974 to act as a breakwater.  After her decommissioning in 1970, she was loaded with stones, towed from Toronto Port to Port Credit and sunk at the entrance to the port  with her cabins and stack intact. She remains here, protecting the port from the forces of waves.  In the backdrop is the City of Toronto, about 20 kilometer away with its landmark CN Tower.


On a windy day, the waves rise up over a few meters.


Canadian Fall is well known for trees with splashes of red, orange and yellow that dot tree lines across the country.


Fall is the most photographed Canadian season of the year, with colours changing very fast until the leaves fall off.


Tender thin leaves are made up of cells filled with water sap and will freeze in winter. Any plant tissue incapable of surviving the winter must be sealed off and shed to ensure the tree’s survival.

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As sunlight decreases in fall, the veins that carry sap into and out of a leaf gradually close. A layer of cells called the separation layer forms at the base of the leaf stem. When this layer is complete, the leaf is separated from the tissue that connected it to the branch and it falls off.


Coniferous trees like pines, spruces, cedars and firs, don’t lose their leaves or needles in winter. The needles are covered with a heavy wax coating and the fluids inside the cells contain substances that resist freezing.

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These needles can live for several years before they fall off.


Ground along the trail is all covered with leaves of varying shades of yellow, orange and red.


Some of the leaves are yet to change their colours and some have done it already.


Old cycles and other artifacts are used to decorate the walkways.

There are many children’s parks along the trail.’


Picnic spots equipped with tables, benches and barbecue stands for the revelers dot the trail.

This is the Suncorp refinery is located about ten kilometer away.


These Canadian geese have not migrated down South to USA.  It is neither that they have lost their passports nor have forgotten to migrate.  It is because they find enough food in various parks in the city and may have developed the art of surviving through Canadian winter.  May be they will fly South as soon as the temperature drops.

A Walk on a Wet Fall Evening


Every evening, I drive to the park near our home for an evening stroll.


The school buses would be returning to their depots after dropping children home.  The yellow coloured bus merges with the yellow coloured trees along the Road.


After parking my car, I get on to the trail.


The trail runs along Credit River which drains into Lake Ontario.


You are sure to meet some waterfowls, ducks etc enroute.


Fall offers a kaleidoscope of colours.


Woods are really, colourful and deep


And I have miles to go before I end my walk.


The green leaf colour comes from pigments of chlorophyll, used by the trees to make food with the help of sunlight. There are other pigments namely carotenoids and anthocyanins present in the leaves, but are overshadowed by the chlorophyll in the spring and summer.


Carotenoids create bright yellows and oranges like in corn, carrots, and bananas.


In the fall, trees break down the green pigments and nutrients stored in the leaves. The nutrients are shuttled into the roots for reuse in the spring.


Some tree leaves turn mostly brown, indicating that all pigments are gone.


Trees respond to the decreasing amount of sunlight by producing less and less chlorophyll and eventually stops producing chlorophyll.


Now the carotenoid in the leaves show through and the leaves become a bright cascade of various shades of glowing yellows.
Anthocyanins impart red colour to fruits like cranberries, red apples, cherries, strawberries, etc.


The fall season being characterised by short days and longer and cooler nights. When a number of warm, sunny autumn days and cool but not freezing nights come one after the other, Maple leaves produce lots of sugar, but the cool night temperatures prevent the sugar sap from flowing through the leaf veins and down into the branches and trunk.

Anthocyanins are now produced by the leaves for protection. They allow the plant to move down the nutrients in the leaves to the roots, before they fall off. The nutrients stored in the roots help the trees to sprout out their leaves in the coming spring. During this time, anthocyanins give leaves their bright, brilliant shades of red, purple and crimson.


Information boards and garbage cans are placed all along the trail.


You are never alone on the trail.


The 5 km trail ends with a flight of stairs to the parking lot.